Tag Archives: Rockwell

Homecoming 2019: Goin’ Down the Bayou

by Katie Hull

Rockwell’s Homecoming, themed as “Goin’ Down the Bayou,” will be held on Saturday, October 12, from 8-11 pm.

Students chose the theme for Homecoming this year as they voted during their mentoring classes back in September. The choices were between Western, Bayou, and Alice in Wonderland, and Bayou received the most votes. The Bayou dance will be decorated with nets, jar lights, fireflies, fog, moss and water as the theme was inspired by the Disney movie The Princess and The Frog. Many students have expressed excitement about the theme and are excited to dress up with their dates.

“I’m excited to go to Homecoming and show off my dress,” said Rockwell junior Katie Lang.

Homecoming will be held on the stage at Rockwell. Tickets can be purchased in the office. Single tickets are $25 and couple tickets are $35 until Friday, October 11. On Friday, single tickets will go up to $35 and couple tickets will be $45. At the door, single tickets will be $40 and couple tickets will be $50.

“I’m excited to spend the whole day with my date,” said Rockwell sophomore V McCumber. “It’ll be fun to hangout with my friends at the dance.”

Homecoming Spirit Week will be held the week of October 7-11. Each day will be a themed dress-up day, and lunchtime activities will be going on all week surrounding these themed dress-up days. Students who participate in the dress-up days and lunchtime activities will be given raffle tickets that will earn them a chance to win prizes at the end of the week.

“Pajama day for spirit week was cool,” said Rockwell senior Kayla Teutschmann. “I love wearing pajamas because then I don’t have to get dressed.”

Homecoming Royalty nominations were announced Monday. Congratulations to the following students who were nominated:

Sophomores:
Ellie Anderson
Grace Maw
Faith Lane
Daniel Ortiz
Landon Henderson
Ethan Barrett

Juniors:
Dakota Dipo
Sophie Jaimes
Haya Al Hawari
Grey Edwards
Ryan Stearns
Mac Beck

Seniors:
Savanna White
Katie Hull
Aimree Swift
Isaiah Gale
Tait Schramm
Joshua Smith

Royalty will participate in lunchtime activities this week, and take part in an assembly on Thursday. King and Queen, Prince and Princess, and Dutch and Dutchess will be crowned at the Homecoming Dance.

From Broadway to Rockwell: Meet Mr. Dave Walker

by Sandro Gvaramia

A good teacher puts their heart into teaching, by doing so, the students feel their passion and hard work. When a teacher works hard for the students, students will put in their effort as well.

Dave Walker, a drama teacher at Rockwell, exemplifies these qualities of a great teacher. He has been involved in acting for 25 years. He has toured with Broadway many times, and has an immense experience in and knowledge of acting. He recently got married, settled in Utah and is currently starring as Joseph Pulitzer in a production of Newsies at the Hale Center Theater in Orem.

“I wanted to teach at Rockwell because I love seeing young students’ devotion and passion for acting at a young age,” Walker said. “This made me want to share what I have gained from all of my experiences as an actor.”

He has enjoyed teaching students at Rockwell and believes that every one of them has a bright future in acting. Student actors at Rockwell really are great at what they do, but some students who have talent for acting are either shy or afraid to take a step for many reasons.

“There are a lot of students in drama and all of them outside of acting are different at what they do in their spare time,” Walker said. “Some love music and some play sports, but that does not hold them back from doing what they are passionate about.”

Students love Walker and say that he has an ability to spark a passion for acting in them.

“Dave is one of the most splendid human beings I have ever met,” said Rockwell senior Jake Meese. “He’s blunt, he’s understanding, genuine, and kind. I have learned so much from him. I will be forever changed by my interactions with him.”

Walker has worked with many respected actors and producers. He has played dozens of roles and has come to teach at Rockwell to give young student actors his insight. He encourages all students who are interested in acting to pursue it as early as possible.

“If you ever thought about wanting to be a part of the drama program, you are always welcome and encouraged to do so,” Walker said. “There is no time like the present.”

RCHS Breaks Ground for Track Friday

by Marshal Magazine Staff

Students, staff, faculty, and community members gathered outside Friday afternoon to celebrate the groundbreaking of Rockwell’s latest addition – a brand new track.

“It’s cool that we’re getting a track,” said Rockwell junior Aimree Swift. “It was neat to be a part of this. Good job, Rockwell.”

The Rockwell track team has been holding track & field practices in the back parking lot since its opening in 2008.

“Having a track at Rockwell is really exciting,” said Rockwell sophomore and track team member Diana Figueroa. “Not only is it going to help our running improve, but it will make it so we don’t have to fight the buses and cars about who gets the parking lot after school.”

Today’s groundbreaking began with a few words from Principal Darren Beck and RCHS board member Tiffany Southern. Athletic Director RaNell Goldthorpe then took her seat in the tractor to dig the first hole, followed by board member Tiffany Southern. Track team members, teachers, staff, seniors, and administrators then took turns completing a celebratory shoveling while posing for a photo.

“It was exciting to witness an expansion of Rockwell,” said Rockwell teacher Jake Hampton. “I think the track will be a great addition to the school, and it’s an honor to see it happen from the beginning.”

The track is set to begin construction soon and will be ready to use beginning with the 2019-2020 school year.

See the gallery below for photos of the event, courtesy Diana Figueroa. 

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Celebrate World Down Syndrome Day with Crazy Socks

by Chae Ewell

57465075592__4538064A-1197-4508-AFBA-854C50ECD312Each year, March 21st marks World Down Syndrome Day. Down Syndrome is a chromosomal disorder that occurs when there’s an error in the process of cell division, resulting in an extra chromosome. The most common form of Down Syndrome is trisomy 21, a third 21st chromosome. This is why we celebrate on March 21st (3/21).

“My sister has trisomy 21,” said Rockwell freshman Doug Ewell. “I think it’s really cool. She is one of the most optimistic and happy people I know.”

As the chromosomes look like socks, we invite you to wear crazy socks on World Down Syndrome Day, March 21. Wear mismatched, crazy colors, knee highs, tie dye, or crazy patterns of any kind. Doing so will help spread awareness and honor those who live with Down Syndrome every day.

(Image via TheStranger.com)

 

Tell Your Story with the GSA

by Katie Hull

The Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) is having a special meeting Thursday, March 7. It is at 3:00 pm in room 22.

This meeting is to share the stories of all those who have come out and have dealt with all of the effects afterwards. This is to make more people aware of the GSA as well as welcome anyone and everyone who would like to join. This meeting is to tell your story and hear theirs. You will be heard and welcomed in without a second thought. This meeting is to gain a new perspective on something that most people haven’t heard. Whether you are gay or straight this meeting is all about support and hearing one another.

“We hope this will be a good opportunity for anyone who attends to put themselves in the place of others,” said the GSA advisor, Mr. Hampton. “Whether you want to share your story or simply listen, we’d love to have you.”

The clubs’ students decided to do this because wanted to share their stories and have them heard. If you do not want to have your name on your story but still want it shared, Mr. Hampton has invited you to share your story anonymously. Send your story to his email, jhampton@rockwellhigh.net, and he will share your story without attaching your name to it. For and added bonus, snacks will be provided at the end! Hope to see you there!

Students campaign to bring cheer team to Rockwell

by Ashlee Milton

Photo: Rockwell’s cheer team in 2014.

Three students are working together to bring back the Rockwell High cheer team.

“We all want to come together to bring something more to Rockwell,” said Rockwell sophomore Kiera Barker. “It would be cool to show support for the sports teams by cheering at their games.”

Mikayla Tanner, Skilin Hacking, and Kiera Barker are some of the girls advocating to bring the team back. The last time Rockwell had a cheer team was in 2014 and was ended due to all the participants graduating.

“We all want to come together to bring something more to Rockwell. It would be cool to show support for the sports teams by cheering at their games.”

– Kiera Barker, sophomore

Mikayla Tanner, a senior at Rockwell, has had some experience with cheer and tumbling for about a year and a half. She brought the idea to Misty with the intentions of starting a team to help all feel like they have a place at the school.

“I think a lot of people at Rockwell could benefit from having a cheer team here,” said Tanner. “I want to be part of creating a place for people to feel included and feel like they can bring more spirit to the school.”

Having a cheer team would help bring more people to the games and more spirit to the school.

Image via Sydnie Holland

10 Years: 10 Changes at Rockwell

by Kaylee Birnbaum

Rockwell turned 10 this year. Here are 10 changes to Rockwell in the 10 years it’s been open.

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Original plans for Rockwell when it opened in 2008.

1. Appearance. A big and probably most obvious change to Rockwell is its appearance. The brick in the commons didn’t used to be painted blue, it used to be plain brown brick. There’s been a few changes to the gym as well. The wood floor used to be a darker wood and the words “posse” and “outlaws” above the bleachers weren’t there. The most recent change to Rockwell’s appearance are the images and quotes on the ceilings in the hallway.

2. Uniforms. Boys and girls both were required to wear khaki pants and any color button up polo of their choice. The dress code was actually picked by the students themselves nine years ago. Mr. Beck did it this way so that if the students were to complain about uniforms, it would fall back on them. The idea behind uniforms is that we are a Charter school and we had a certain image to keep.

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Four of Rockwell’s teachers who have been here since it’s opening in 2008: Mr. Hull, Candice, Ms. Holt, and Mr. Young.

“I didn’t really like the whole uniform thing,” said Andy Young, a current teacher at Rockwell who has been teaching at Rockwell since its opening. “I don’t believe a uniform makes you smarter.”

 

The uniforms only lasted for, roughly, the first two years of opening.

3. Sports. Rockwell’s sports weren’t always a part of the UHSAA (Utah High School Activities Association). In its first year, Rockwell sports were not part of this association. In its second year, though, the drill team was the first to compete in the UHSAA. Rockwell won the state basketball title that year.

4. Clubs. Rockwell used to have some really unique clubs. There was a D&D club, a chess club, a snowboarding club, and even golf.

“We have really become a more unified school,” said Rockwell teacher Amy Holt, who has been teaching at Rockwell since its opening. “I think that’s because of all the sports, clubs, and programs we have had through the years.”

5. Cheerleaders. Even though Rockwell has never had a football team, we did have cheerleaders at one point. They cheered for the boys and girls basketball teams and also at the volleyball games. It was a fun way to bring school spirit and energy to our sports games. Due to drama with the girls, Rockwell decided to discontinue the cheer team.

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Rockwell Girls Varsity Basketball team 2013-2014.

6. Enrollment. There were more students enrolled here at Rockwell the first year of opening than ever before. There were roughly 600-630 students the first year with up to 30 students in some classrooms. The average amount of students is 530; we currently have 503 enrolled. Once Westlake opened in 2009, we lost about 200 kids.

7. Cafeteria. The cafeteria used to be called “the outpost.” People claim it was more like a store rather than a cafeteria. They had food and snacks that you could buy and the food was catered for a little while.

8. Teachers. Just like any other school, we’ve gained some and lost some. We’ve had a lot of teachers come and go in the last 10 years.

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Mr. Young in Rockwell’s early years.

“Charter schools are difficult,” said Holt, “especially if you are a first year teacher.”

Mr. Beck has done a great job in unifying our school.

“I think the main thing is teaching, and Rockwell can be more challenging than most,” he said. “I give teachers a hard time because I feel that they need to have all their crap together.”

9. Student Involvement. Students are getting more involved. That’s an important part in becoming a school is to be involved and aware of all that’s going on around. Being involved is also a good way to be able to be social.

10. Change. The last and biggest and change of Rockwell is that it will always be changing. There are things that can always be improved in ours and every other school. It’s about figuring out what works and what doesn’t.

“Every year seems to bring new challenges with incoming generations,” said Candice, one of Rockwell’s administrators. “We’re excited to see what the future has in store.”

Changes at our school have been positive thanks to the administration, faculty, and all the students who have gone here. Happy 10th birthday Rockwell.

‘This American Life’: Q&A with Rockwell’s Exchange Students

by Kaya Garza

Many of us have been personally touched by exchange students as we’ve learned so much about their cultures, way of life, and languages. When they come to Rockwell, they bring little pieces of their country with them and we are lucky enough to have them share that with us as they see our country through foreign lenses.

Marshal Magazine sat down with some of these foreign exchange students to find out more about where they came from and their time in America.

Fabio Malta, Brazil

IMG_2902Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The prices.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The parties.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: New family and friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Americans are less friendly than Brazilians.

Q: Do you like America?
A: For sure.

Jeff Yuan, China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The way of government and school.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The food.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: School.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

Jun, South Korea

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The food.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The driving/drivers.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Food

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: I miss my friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: School is very different.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes.

Hanter, China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The culture and the respect.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: Education

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Making good friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Church. It is a big part of everything.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

Chrystee , China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: America has a different culture, and the houses are very different.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The people are really helpful and nice.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: School.

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A:The weather.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes.

Sofie Larsen, Denmark

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: I love the outgoing people, and I love that everyone speaks English. I love this language.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: I love the culture, the habits, family, food, and drinking. I can drink in Denmark.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Fast food places! Everywhere!

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Having to leave and say goodbye to good friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Nobody wears the same style, everybody wears Converse, and dinner is so early!

Q: Do you like America?
A: I love it. “Put, I’m loving it!“

Clemens Block, Germany

Screen Shot 2018-03-27 at 4.15.14 PMQ: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: I like it that sports are more of a focus in school. You have much more possibilities to practice and do your sport in a competitive way because the school is respecting your sport and is helping you do it by the different high school teams. You can also practice during school which I think is very cool.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: I like it that you have better possibilities to learn other languages.
Also, I like that you are not only learning the surface of a math topic.

Q: What is your fave thing about the U.S.?
A: I like that you can get your driver‘s license at 16.

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: It’s a little bit the racism in some states, which I didn‘t really notice, but I am often hearing some bad news over it.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: The first thing was definitely the food, which caused some stomach problems. It’s not bad, and it’s better than our food, but our food is healthier. It was also a bit hard for me to understand American English because I was used to British English.

Q: Do you like America?
A: I would say I love America. It is the country of many possibilities. The people are very relaxed and also very nice to non-native speakers, which surprised me.

Aom, Thailand

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The people, they are so friendly and helpful!

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The food.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Kaya

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Americans are very sad some days and very happy the next.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Americans eat dinner together and do everything together!

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

May, Thailand

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: Sidewalks! They make things easier.

Screen Shot 2018-03-27 at 4.15.00 PMQ: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The culture and the importance of respect.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: The weather.

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Little children are crazy.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Water fountains. We don’t have those

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

Daniel, China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: It is much bigger.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: Everything is very convenient.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Basketball, friends

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

We’ve Got Spirit…How ‘Bout You?

by Sidney Bernabeu

Rockwell may be a small school but their school spirit makes the school seem a lot bigger.

Rockwell’s students are enthusiastic about cheering on their school. They cheer on their peers whenever the chance to arises. Students aren’t afraid to show some school pride; they cheer on the school’s teams as much as they can. Student government organizes activities and assemblies for students so they can show school spirit by getting involved and have some fun while doing it.

Rockwell encourages its students and community to get involved in service, each year the school does a “change wars” fundraiser to raise money to bring holiday cheer to Rockwell families. Rockwell’s students always come out to support their school it doesn’t matter when it is, students always come.

“I love Rockwell,” said senior Aubri Bailey. “I love how small it is. I love the teachers and I love how everyone knows each other. I also love playing volleyball and softball here. Honestly, I’m not ready to leave high school. High school is my safe place. I’m graduating, and I’m excited, but I’m scared at the same time.”

Rockwell students love to support the school at various events.

“I think Rockwell has a lot of school spirit. We come together at basketball games and make sure we support the teams. But I feel like we need to support the school as a whole – not just the athletic events. School spirit isn’t just about cheering on the athletic teams – it’s about cheering on the school.”

– Katherine Pinheiro, junior

Whether students have been here since 7th grade, or have transferred in mid-year, they love what they find here at Rockwell.

“I came from Orem High mid-year, and I love that the teachers are a lot more accessible here,” said junior Peyton McCann-Ashton. “Having moved in the middle of the term and being socially anxious, it is difficult for me to start a conversation to make friends, but here, I didn’t have to. Everyone is friendly and that makes it easier to talk and have fun with others.”

From Walkout to Lockdown: Rockwell Students say ‘Enough is Enough’

by Kaya Garza

Students at Rockwell Charter High School participated in a nationwide protest against gun violence Wednesday by walking out of their classrooms at exactly 10:00 am. More than 65 Rockwell students participated in the peaceful protest that lasted 17 minutes.

IMG_4992“When the walkout happened, quite a few students went to the back parking lot,” said Rockwell sophomore, Katie Hull. “During the 17 minutes, we paid respect to the victims. A couple students read the names of every victim in the Parkland shooting. It was really powerful.”

The walkout lasted for 17 minutes to honor those 17 students who lost their lives in the February 14th shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Rockwell students exercised their First Amendment rights to freedom of speech and the right to form assembly as they chanted things like “enough is enough” and “17 minutes for 17 lives” while marching from the back of the school to the front. Some students also marched with signs that said things like “enough” and “17 minutes.”

But not all students felt walking out was the correct approach. Some felt the alternative “Walk Up, Not Out” movement would be more effective.

“I felt like the walkout wasn’t the right way to go about it,” said Rockwell student Mikayla Tanner. “Walk Up is approaching new people and showing them they have someone there. When you’re talking to new people they feel valued. None of those shooters felt cared about. It wouldn’t just help end gun violence, but suicide and self harm as well. But I wasn’t against it, I still support everyone who decided to walk out. Just for me personally, it wasn’t the best approach.”

Approximately 30 minutes later, after students had already gone back to their classes, Rockwell counselor Misty Madsen received a call from police about a man who showed up to the Maverik near Rockwell with a rifle strapped to his chest.

“I was just chilling and teaching when there was an announcement about a lockdown,” said Rockwell teacher Jacob Hampton. “I was already having a discussion about the walkout with my students when the announcement happened, and I also got a text that went out to all the staff. I instructed my students to go to a corner as I turned off the lights and removed the door magnet.”

The lockdown was called off about 20 minutes later when the man left Maverik property.

“The man mentioned that he heard Rockwell was participating in the walkout and he wanted to spread some kind of message about his rights as an American,” said a Maverick employee. “He wasn’t doing anything illegal, as Utah is an open-carry state.”IMG_5002

This man intended to “educate” Rockwell students who participated in the walkout about the Second Amendment, but police confirmed there was no immediate threat to the safety of students and staff at Rockwell.

“Sadly, too many people misunderstood the aims of the walkout – students and adults, alike,” said Rockwell’s Principal Darren Beck. “That was a horrible way to teach people, by scaring them.”

This lockdown taught Rockwell some important lessons about how to stay calm should a similar situation ever arise again.

“I think that we, as teachers, staff, and students, learned that we need to be more prepared if something like this were to happen again,” said Rockwell student Megan Nelson. “We should have more drills. These kinds of things could last for hours and people were freaking out after a few minutes. It really put things into perspective.”

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