Tag Archives: Rockwell

We’ve Got Spirit…How ‘Bout You?

by Sidney Bernabeu

Rockwell may be a small school but their school spirit makes the school seem a lot bigger.

Rockwell’s students are enthusiastic about cheering on their school. They cheer on their peers whenever the chance to arises. Students aren’t afraid to show some school pride; they cheer on the school’s teams as much as they can. Student government organizes activities and assemblies for students so they can show school spirit by getting involved and have some fun while doing it.

Rockwell encourages its students and community to get involved in service, each year the school does a “change wars” fundraiser to raise money to bring holiday cheer to Rockwell families. Rockwell’s students always come out to support their school it doesn’t matter when it is, students always come.

“I love Rockwell,” said senior Aubri Bailey. “I love how small it is. I love the teachers and I love how everyone knows each other. I also love playing volleyball and softball here. Honestly, I’m not ready to leave high school. High school is my safe place. I’m graduating, and I’m excited, but I’m scared at the same time.”

Rockwell students love to support the school at various events.

“I think Rockwell has a lot of school spirit. We come together at basketball games and make sure we support the teams. But I feel like we need to support the school as a whole – not just the athletic events. School spirit isn’t just about cheering on the athletic teams – it’s about cheering on the school.”

– Katherine Pinheiro, junior

Whether students have been here since 7th grade, or have transferred in mid-year, they love what they find here at Rockwell.

“I came from Orem High mid-year, and I love that the teachers are a lot more accessible here,” said junior Peyton McCann-Ashton. “Having moved in the middle of the term and being socially anxious, it is difficult for me to start a conversation to make friends, but here, I didn’t have to. Everyone is friendly and that makes it easier to talk and have fun with others.”

From Walkout to Lockdown: Rockwell Students say ‘Enough is Enough’

by Kaya Garza

Students at Rockwell Charter High School participated in a nationwide protest against gun violence Wednesday by walking out of their classrooms at exactly 10:00 am. More than 65 Rockwell students participated in the peaceful protest that lasted 17 minutes.

IMG_4992“When the walkout happened, quite a few students went to the back parking lot,” said Rockwell sophomore, Katie Hull. “During the 17 minutes, we paid respect to the victims. A couple students read the names of every victim in the Parkland shooting. It was really powerful.”

The walkout lasted for 17 minutes to honor those 17 students who lost their lives in the February 14th shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Rockwell students exercised their First Amendment rights to freedom of speech and the right to form assembly as they chanted things like “enough is enough” and “17 minutes for 17 lives” while marching from the back of the school to the front. Some students also marched with signs that said things like “enough” and “17 minutes.”

But not all students felt walking out was the correct approach. Some felt the alternative “Walk Up, Not Out” movement would be more effective.

“I felt like the walkout wasn’t the right way to go about it,” said Rockwell student Mikayla Tanner. “Walk Up is approaching new people and showing them they have someone there. When you’re talking to new people they feel valued. None of those shooters felt cared about. It wouldn’t just help end gun violence, but suicide and self harm as well. But I wasn’t against it, I still support everyone who decided to walk out. Just for me personally, it wasn’t the best approach.”

Approximately 30 minutes later, after students had already gone back to their classes, Rockwell counselor Misty Madsen received a call from police about a man who showed up to the Maverik near Rockwell with a rifle strapped to his chest.

“I was just chilling and teaching when there was an announcement about a lockdown,” said Rockwell teacher Jacob Hampton. “I was already having a discussion about the walkout with my students when the announcement happened, and I also got a text that went out to all the staff. I instructed my students to go to a corner as I turned off the lights and removed the door magnet.”

The lockdown was called off about 20 minutes later when the man left Maverik property.

“The man mentioned that he heard Rockwell was participating in the walkout and he wanted to spread some kind of message about his rights as an American,” said a Maverick employee. “He wasn’t doing anything illegal, as Utah is an open-carry state.”IMG_5002

This man intended to “educate” Rockwell students who participated in the walkout about the Second Amendment, but police confirmed there was no immediate threat to the safety of students and staff at Rockwell.

“Sadly, too many people misunderstood the aims of the walkout – students and adults, alike,” said Rockwell’s Principal Darren Beck. “That was a horrible way to teach people, by scaring them.”

This lockdown taught Rockwell some important lessons about how to stay calm should a similar situation ever arise again.

“I think that we, as teachers, staff, and students, learned that we need to be more prepared if something like this were to happen again,” said Rockwell student Megan Nelson. “We should have more drills. These kinds of things could last for hours and people were freaking out after a few minutes. It really put things into perspective.”

Athletes of Rockwell: Senior Night

by Alyssa Smith

The girls basketball team celebrated the seniors last week as they played APA Draper at home.

“Seniors: this is your last home game,” said Coach Troy Gifford. “So play your hearts out.”

This year’s team consisted of four seniors – Destiny Dipo, Megan Nelson, Kylee Berry, and Livia Chatwin – and two foreign exchange students – Sofie Larsen and Aom Kayhasai. Some of them have decided to take up basketball this year and have learned a lot in the process. Destiny Dipo has been playing high school basketball at Rockwell since 9th grade.

“Obviously the team changes every year,” Dipo said. “We just keep getting better and better.”

The team will miss having these seniors and exchange students next year.

“I wish I could come back and play next year,” said Aom Kayhasai, an exchange student from Thailand. “I love these girls so much.”

The girls on both JV and Varsity put everything into that game and came out with a win. The varsity score was 48-30.

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Junior high basketball teams find first win of the season Monday

by Alyssa Smith and Sidney Bernabeu | Marshal Magazine |

The junior high boys and girls basketball teams took their first wins of the season against Ascent Lehi Monday night. 

Both teams have great team chemistry and stayed positive throughout the game.

“I feel like our team worked really hard and deserved the win,” said boys point guard Tyler Smith.

The boys are continuing to improve as the season goes on, and now is their chance to start a winning streak.

The junior high girls also crushed Acsent 45-27 Monday night. They started out and finished the game strong. They knew their plays and were prepared to win.

The girls showed their dedication throughout the game. As the other team started gaining points, they stepped up their game and played harder than the other team. The girls have fun while playing and work great as a team.

They work hard and are ready for a great season.

3 Tips for Conquering Senioritis

by Kaylee Birnbaum | Marshal Magazine |

1)  Keep yourself healthy – Health is the key here. When you’re healthy, you’re feeling better, and when you’re feeling better, you will be more focused. Make sure you are going to bed at a decent hour and eating nice healthy meals throughout the day. When you wake up after a good night’s rest, you will feel fresh and ready to tackle another day.

2) Get involved – You’re not going to be in high school for much longer, so you might as well make the most of it now. Join clubs or teams that you are interested in and enjoy. “Being on the baseball team has kept me motivated to do my schoolwork,” said Keegan Beck, Rockwell Senior. It’s very easy to overlook these things, but it’s important to keep in mind that you may never have opportunities like this again.

3) Don’t work hard, work really hard – This is your last chance to prove to colleges that you are motivated and determined. You have gone to school almost all of your life, don’t give up now when you’re already at the end. One more year compared to 12 is a piece of cake. “You have to keep the end goal in mind when focusing on your future,” said Mya Salinas from Rockwell Charter High School. “My supportive teachers have really helped me a lot.”

STEM bus visits Rockwell

The STEM bus made its first high school stop at Rockwell Charter High School September 5.

Endeavor (previously Tesoro) approached the STEM Action Center last year to create a bus to reach all communities. It is the STEM Action Center’s mission to reach rural areas and prepare them for a STEM-competitive workforce.

STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics.

Program coordinator, Abby Dowd, was first introduced to STEM in college where it became her passion, and she wanted to share it.

Graphic designers, programmers, play testers, animators, and game designers all play a major part in the STEM program.

Other program coordinator says his favorite part about his job is being able to learn along with the students.

“STEM is the future,” said Dowd.

Each STEM bus visit begins with a lecture from the program coordinators, then students are able to put their listening skills to work and use their imagination. These activities range from designing video games to building robots.

“I have always

liked the second part of the lecture when it just ‘clicked’ for the students,” said Dowd.

Brad Hunsaker, program coordinator, said STEM is important because that is where all the jobs are going.

“STEM is the future and we need to prepare students for that,” Hunsaker said.

The program will continue to grow, and jobs are constantly available in this area.

“As technology changes, so does STEM,” said Dowd. “We hope to prepare students for the competitive STEM workforce that lies ahead.”

You paint your own road

by Keegan Beck

There is a large handful of metaphors used when it comes to graduation, but I want to paint you a picture of one seldom overused.

Picture this: you are sitting in a car, you look in front of you, and you see an open road. Now, picture again, a road that is filled with cars, stopping, going, and stopping again. This is a situation many of us face every day, and that is a metaphor for our every day lives.

With graduation just hours away, the graduating class of 2017 has a lot to think about and a lot to enjoy. This day has been waiting for these seniors. But these seniors have not stopped plugging along to reach their final destination in this chapter of their lives – high school graduation. They will anxiously walk across the stage and receive that diploma. But that is not the end. It is just the beginning. What road will these graduates take?


“Your future is really up to you. You paint your own road.”


Be sure to join the Rockwell class of 2017 graduates at the Show Barn at Thanksgiving Point on May 25, 2017. The ceremony will start at 6:00 pm.