Opinion: Is Black History Month Racist?

by Kaya Garza

Ever since Black History Month became a thing, there were people who stood firmly against it. There were people who said, “Gee. Why don’t me and my white ancestors get a history month? Don’t you think that’s a bit racist?”

Well, let me explain it to you.

Let’s start from the beginning. Black History Month began as “Negro History Week,” created by Dr. Carter G. Woodson. His intentions were very clear- he wanted to create such a time where the successes and triumphs of African-Americans were no longer overlooked and disregarded, and to cultivate an environment of learning, respect, and understanding. This eventually turned into “Black History Month,” which was celebrated in certain colleges and communities, and finally became recognized by President Gerald Ford in 1976.

Now, like we have seen, people were indifferent to the notion of a month dedicated to people who aren’t white, because this “separates black people from being Americans.”

Now, claiming they aren’t Americans is clearly atrocious, but honoring them, their history and cultures which we spent so long trying to erase, is NOT an act of separation and division, it is an act of respect and reparation.

When the majority of our elementary history was dedicated to certain “heroes” of the Civil War like Robert E. Lee, to our Founding Fathers, to our long line of clearly white presidents, to our colonial roots, the books have simply overlooked African-American achievement- and one month, trust me, couldn’t even cover a quarter. To honor such achievements of these true heroes and innovators of our country’s history is vital, and an absolute obligation.

Claiming that we should simply be blind to color and race is a sick attempt at burying the issues in the ground and pretending they don’t exist. Ignoring beautiful cultures and ways of life is not only ridiculous, but careless.

It is incorrect to suggest that a month dedicated to black people is an act of racism against white people who feel that their history is being erased in the process. This is a country built upon white supremacy; the “heroes” of our past are drenched in blood. This is a country where slavery has continually progressed- from chains, to segregation, to stereotypes- and everything in between. The endless media that pertains to ideas that every young black boy wants to be a basketball player and that every young black girl is loud and sassy, and that the “hood” and gangs are the closest thing to success black people will get is all that’s been fed into our brains. Black people are not drug dealers, gang members, and so on – they are doctors, soldiers, scientists, authors, and the like.

They have been too long overlooked. Asking for appreciation for 28 days out of the year is not racist, it is equalizing.

Athletes of Rockwell: Senior Night

by Alyssa Smith

The girls basketball team celebrated the seniors last week as they played APA Draper at home.

“Seniors: this is your last home game,” said Coach Troy Gifford. “So play your hearts out.”

This year’s team consisted of four seniors – Destiny Dipo, Megan Nelson, Kylee Berry, and Livia Chatwin – and two foreign exchange students – Sofie Larsen and Aom Kayhasai. Some of them have decided to take up basketball this year and have learned a lot in the process. Destiny Dipo has been playing high school basketball at Rockwell since 9th grade.

“Obviously the team changes every year,” Dipo said. “We just keep getting better and better.”

The team will miss having these seniors and exchange students next year.

“I wish I could come back and play next year,” said Aom Kayhasai, an exchange student from Thailand. “I love these girls so much.”

The girls on both JV and Varsity put everything into that game and came out with a win. The varsity score was 48-30.

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Humans of Rockwell

Athletes of Rockwell: Lady Marshals defeat UMA in home opener

by Sidney Bernabeu | Marshal Magazine |

Both girls Varsity and JV teams defeated the Utah Military Academy Monday.

Varsity won 55-20. They came onto the court well prepared and ready to win.

IMG_4239The team is mostly made up of new girls this year but, as the team showed against UMA, they know what it takes to be a good team.

“It was a really great game,” said sophomore Brie Searle. “We worked as a team. We had really good team effort and we all worked with each other.”

The JV team won 42-7, and they were also up for the challenge of winning. Although this group of girls just started playing together, they are prepared to win and their season looks promising.

Junior high basketball teams find first win of the season Monday

by Alyssa Smith and Sidney Bernabeu | Marshal Magazine |

The junior high boys and girls basketball teams took their first wins of the season against Ascent Lehi Monday night. 

Both teams have great team chemistry and stayed positive throughout the game.

“I feel like our team worked really hard and deserved the win,” said boys point guard Tyler Smith.

The boys are continuing to improve as the season goes on, and now is their chance to start a winning streak.

The junior high girls also crushed Acsent 45-27 Monday night. They started out and finished the game strong. They knew their plays and were prepared to win.

The girls showed their dedication throughout the game. As the other team started gaining points, they stepped up their game and played harder than the other team. The girls have fun while playing and work great as a team.

They work hard and are ready for a great season.

Teachers of Rockwell: Jacob Hampton

by Kaylee Birnbaum | Marshal Magazine |

Jacob Hampton is a new teacher at Rockwell this year. He teaches English 11 and Intro to Film. Students have gotten to know and love the way he contributes to our school.

“I love when my students and I can joke together,” Hampton said. “Telling people what to do all day is taxing, so it’s nice when we can all forget about that dynamic for a minute and just laugh together.”

Hampton attended UVU, got a black belt in karate when he was 12, and secretly wishes he had mind reading powers. He has a passion for film and has written for UVU’s newspaper, worked as a film critic for a website called Rogue Auteurs, and even had his own band in high school called Juice Box. They won Orem High School’s Battle of the Bands in 2011 and continued to advance to the state level of competition. Music and movies have always been a big part of Hampton’s life.

Becoming a teacher is something in which Hampton finds great fulfillment.

“I wanted to become a teacher because I love being able to share things I’m passionate about with others in ways that help them learn,” Hampton said.

Hampton works hard in what he does and always has the students’ interests in mind. Helping students is what he loves to do.

To those wanting to become a teacher, Hampton says to have a thick skin.

“Don’t worry,” Hampton said. “Not all the kids who act like they hate you actually do.”

Rockwell is glad to have Hampton as a member of the team.

Change Wars: Donate to a local family in need

Student government hosted an assembly Thursday afternoon encouraging students, teachers, and faculty, to participate in this year’s Change Wars event.

“This is the kickoff for a fun service challenge for the whole school including us as faculty and staff members,” said principal Darren Beck. “Over the 9 years we have done this, we have provided meaningful holiday cheer to about 2 dozen families.”

Change Wars is a competition taking place from now through December. Jars

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representing each grade can be found in the front office. Students may place pennies in their own grade’s jar to earn points, or they can choose to “bomb” other grades with dollar bills, deducting points from the “bombed” grade’s score.

At the conclusion of the bombing period, all money will be counted and points will be calculated based on how many pennies and how many other coins/dollar bills are in the jars. The winning grade will receive a pizza party during Mentoring.

 

“Hopefully we will get people motivated so we can do some good this year,” said Beck.

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Holiday Night Live performs skit at Change Wars Assembly.

The assembly featured the high school orchestra as they performed the Star Spangled Banner. The high school girls and boys basketball teams, the junior high girls and boys basketball teams, the indoor soccer team, and the cast and crew of Holiday Night Live were also featured.
Ultimately, the assembly was filled with energy. Marshals felt the excitement of the coming basketball season, which starts December 1 with the Homecoming game, followed by the Homecoming dance the next day. Tickets are $15 per single ticket or $25 per couple.

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