We’ve Got Spirit…How ‘Bout You?

by Sidney Bernabeu

Rockwell may be a small school but their school spirit makes the school seem a lot bigger.

Rockwell’s students are enthusiastic about cheering on their school. They cheer on their peers whenever the chance to arises. Students aren’t afraid to show some school pride; they cheer on the school’s teams as much as they can. Student government organizes activities and assemblies for students so they can show school spirit by getting involved and have some fun while doing it.

Rockwell encourages its students and community to get involved in service, each year the school does a “change wars” fundraiser to raise money to bring holiday cheer to Rockwell families. Rockwell’s students always come out to support their school it doesn’t matter when it is, students always come.

“I love Rockwell,” said senior Aubri Bailey. “I love how small it is. I love the teachers and I love how everyone knows each other. I also love playing volleyball and softball here. Honestly, I’m not ready to leave high school. High school is my safe place. I’m graduating, and I’m excited, but I’m scared at the same time.”

Rockwell students love to support the school at various events.

“I think Rockwell has a lot of school spirit. We come together at basketball games and make sure we support the teams. But I feel like we need to support the school as a whole – not just the athletic events. School spirit isn’t just about cheering on the athletic teams – it’s about cheering on the school.”

– Katherine Pinheiro, junior

Whether students have been here since 7th grade, or have transferred in mid-year, they love what they find here at Rockwell.

“I came from Orem High mid-year, and I love that the teachers are a lot more accessible here,” said junior Peyton McCann-Ashton. “Having moved in the middle of the term and being socially anxious, it is difficult for me to start a conversation to make friends, but here, I didn’t have to. Everyone is friendly and that makes it easier to talk and have fun with others.”

Sterling Parker: The Voice of Rockwell

by Alyssa Smith

Since the age of three, basketball has been of interest to Coach Parker.

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“My mother enjoyed sports and bought me a little hoop that hung on the kitchen door,” he said. “I would put my underwear on backwards and shoot all day.”

Parker grew up on a mink ranch on Dimple Dell Road and had chores as early as five years old.

“My folks taught me how to work early in life,” he says. “I am still working and I am 70 years old.”

This work ethic has carried Parker through difficult times in his life.

 

Parker has been going to high school basketball games since he was a young boy, and sports have always been a big part of his life.

Parker currently enjoys coaching the Rockwell boys’ basketball team. He feels fortunate to know the players and their background stories.

“Teaching them to be successful in life is very important to me,” he said. “I try to help them see that failure is not an option.”

 

Parker has been teaching and coaching at Rockwell for 6 years. He started announcing games as the voice of Rockwell before he began coaching the sophomore boys team four years ago. He looks out for students and is a friend to all.

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“I want each student to know they are loved and that everyone has self worth,” he said. “We are all someone.”

Parker also enjoys having friendships with the staff and working with people he cares about.

“Working at Rockwell is an amazing experience,” Parker said. “I get the choice blessing of working with my daughter, Candice, every day.”

Rockwell faculty members appreciate Parker and his dedication to the students, the basketball team, and the school.

Muscular Intensity meets Exhilaration in Marvel’s The Black Panther

by Alyssa Smith

The Black Panther was released to theaters on February 16. It was a thrilling new Marvel movie that has been the only movie since Avatar to top the box office for five straight weeks in a row.

“It was such an amazing movie,” said Rockwell sophomore Felicia Jacquez. “Everyone should go see it.”

Critics enjoyed this movie and thought it was very well-done.

“Like Taika Waititi before him, Ryan Coogler gives the Marvel template a bold auteurist twist with an African extravaganza,” said critic Jimi Famurewa. “It packs a muscular intensity and challenges as much as it exhilarates.”

Although Rotten Tomatoes gives this film a high 97%, a few people disagree with the majority vote.

“The film spirals into a stodgy tale of internecine feuding, in which T’Challa is required to come to terms with the sins of past generations,” said Ed Power, a critic from the Irish Independent. “What he doesn’t get to do much of is jump around beating up bad guys. That’s a shame.”

Go see The Black Panther, now in theaters, and let Marshal Magazine know what you think of the film.

From Walkout to Lockdown: Rockwell Students say ‘Enough is Enough’

by Kaya Garza

Students at Rockwell Charter High School participated in a nationwide protest against gun violence Wednesday by walking out of their classrooms at exactly 10:00 am. More than 65 Rockwell students participated in the peaceful protest that lasted 17 minutes.

IMG_4992“When the walkout happened, quite a few students went to the back parking lot,” said Rockwell sophomore, Katie Hull. “During the 17 minutes, we paid respect to the victims. A couple students read the names of every victim in the Parkland shooting. It was really powerful.”

The walkout lasted for 17 minutes to honor those 17 students who lost their lives in the February 14th shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Rockwell students exercised their First Amendment rights to freedom of speech and the right to form assembly as they chanted things like “enough is enough” and “17 minutes for 17 lives” while marching from the back of the school to the front. Some students also marched with signs that said things like “enough” and “17 minutes.”

But not all students felt walking out was the correct approach. Some felt the alternative “Walk Up, Not Out” movement would be more effective.

“I felt like the walkout wasn’t the right way to go about it,” said Rockwell student Mikayla Tanner. “Walk Up is approaching new people and showing them they have someone there. When you’re talking to new people they feel valued. None of those shooters felt cared about. It wouldn’t just help end gun violence, but suicide and self harm as well. But I wasn’t against it, I still support everyone who decided to walk out. Just for me personally, it wasn’t the best approach.”

Approximately 30 minutes later, after students had already gone back to their classes, Rockwell counselor Misty Madsen received a call from police about a man who showed up to the Maverik near Rockwell with a rifle strapped to his chest.

“I was just chilling and teaching when there was an announcement about a lockdown,” said Rockwell teacher Jacob Hampton. “I was already having a discussion about the walkout with my students when the announcement happened, and I also got a text that went out to all the staff. I instructed my students to go to a corner as I turned off the lights and removed the door magnet.”

The lockdown was called off about 20 minutes later when the man left Maverik property.

“The man mentioned that he heard Rockwell was participating in the walkout and he wanted to spread some kind of message about his rights as an American,” said a Maverick employee. “He wasn’t doing anything illegal, as Utah is an open-carry state.”IMG_5002

This man intended to “educate” Rockwell students who participated in the walkout about the Second Amendment, but police confirmed there was no immediate threat to the safety of students and staff at Rockwell.

“Sadly, too many people misunderstood the aims of the walkout – students and adults, alike,” said Rockwell’s Principal Darren Beck. “That was a horrible way to teach people, by scaring them.”

This lockdown taught Rockwell some important lessons about how to stay calm should a similar situation ever arise again.

“I think that we, as teachers, staff, and students, learned that we need to be more prepared if something like this were to happen again,” said Rockwell student Megan Nelson. “We should have more drills. These kinds of things could last for hours and people were freaking out after a few minutes. It really put things into perspective.”

Opinion: Is Black History Month Racist?

by Kaya Garza

Ever since Black History Month became a thing, there were people who stood firmly against it. There were people who said, “Gee. Why don’t me and my white ancestors get a history month? Don’t you think that’s a bit racist?”

Well, let me explain it to you.

Let’s start from the beginning. Black History Month began as “Negro History Week,” created by Dr. Carter G. Woodson. His intentions were very clear- he wanted to create such a time where the successes and triumphs of African-Americans were no longer overlooked and disregarded, and to cultivate an environment of learning, respect, and understanding. This eventually turned into “Black History Month,” which was celebrated in certain colleges and communities, and finally became recognized by President Gerald Ford in 1976.

Now, like we have seen, people were indifferent to the notion of a month dedicated to people who aren’t white, because this “separates black people from being Americans.”

Now, claiming they aren’t Americans is clearly atrocious, but honoring them, their history and cultures which we spent so long trying to erase, is NOT an act of separation and division, it is an act of respect and reparation.

When the majority of our elementary history was dedicated to certain “heroes” of the Civil War like Robert E. Lee, to our Founding Fathers, to our long line of clearly white presidents, to our colonial roots, the books have simply overlooked African-American achievement- and one month, trust me, couldn’t even cover a quarter. To honor such achievements of these true heroes and innovators of our country’s history is vital, and an absolute obligation.

Claiming that we should simply be blind to color and race is a sick attempt at burying the issues in the ground and pretending they don’t exist. Ignoring beautiful cultures and ways of life is not only ridiculous, but careless.

It is incorrect to suggest that a month dedicated to black people is an act of racism against white people who feel that their history is being erased in the process. This is a country built upon white supremacy; the “heroes” of our past are drenched in blood. This is a country where slavery has continually progressed- from chains, to segregation, to stereotypes- and everything in between. The endless media that pertains to ideas that every young black boy wants to be a basketball player and that every young black girl is loud and sassy, and that the “hood” and gangs are the closest thing to success black people will get is all that’s been fed into our brains. Black people are not drug dealers, gang members, and so on – they are doctors, soldiers, scientists, authors, and the like.

They have been too long overlooked. Asking for appreciation for 28 days out of the year is not racist, it is equalizing.

Athletes of Rockwell: Senior Night

by Alyssa Smith

The girls basketball team celebrated the seniors last week as they played APA Draper at home.

“Seniors: this is your last home game,” said Coach Troy Gifford. “So play your hearts out.”

This year’s team consisted of four seniors – Destiny Dipo, Megan Nelson, Kylee Berry, and Livia Chatwin – and two foreign exchange students – Sofie Larsen and Aom Kayhasai. Some of them have decided to take up basketball this year and have learned a lot in the process. Destiny Dipo has been playing high school basketball at Rockwell since 9th grade.

“Obviously the team changes every year,” Dipo said. “We just keep getting better and better.”

The team will miss having these seniors and exchange students next year.

“I wish I could come back and play next year,” said Aom Kayhasai, an exchange student from Thailand. “I love these girls so much.”

The girls on both JV and Varsity put everything into that game and came out with a win. The varsity score was 48-30.

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Teachers of Rockwell: Faculty Shares their Best and Worst Dates

by Kaylee Birnbaum | Dates can be super fun, but some can be a total waste of time; you never know quite what to expect. We interviewed teachers at Rockwell to hear about some of the best and worst dates they’ve ever had.

“I was casually dating this girl. I picked her up in my freshly painted VW Squareback on our way to Raging Waters. After about 15 minutes, she slipped off her sandals and put her foot right on my newly painted pinstripes. I asked her ‘Will you take your feet off my dash?’ She rolled her eyes and took her feet down. A few minutes later, she put them back up again and started wiggling her toes trying to prove a point. I pulled over my car and told her to get out. I had a great time at Raging Waters by myself, though.” – Andrew Young

“My first and only date was going to a drive in movie on a TWO seat red tractor. After that, I was the ‘nerd of the school.’ Everybody had trucks and cars and I had a tractor.” – Sterling Parker

“My best date was the first date I had with my wife. Part of it was at the beach near San Francisco. As we were walking in the ocean, the current got ahold of her and took her completely under. I reached down in the water, grabbed her shirt as hard as I could and lifted her out. So I saved her life on the first date making me look really good!” – Brian Hull

“One of my favorite dates was playing Finger Paint Pictionary! Painting Chuck Norris was a challenge, but he figured it out. I also went on a date from a dating app and we went out to eat. At one point he stopped in the middle of his sentence, paused and said ‘Sorry, I just got lost in your eyes.’” – SarahKay Larsen

“On the first date with my second fiancee, we ordered a pizza, headed up the canyon, roasted marshmallows, and just talked. Talked for HOURS. We got attacked by a wild raccoon (true story, he stole most of our candy), lit a page on fire from ‘Wreck This Journal,’ and kissed in the rain. It was simple and sweet.” – Marshall Madsen

“I went on a date in college to a concert. My date asked if I could drive and not thinking much of it I said yes. Once we got to the concert, I realized that he had only bought his ticket and I had to buy my own. During the show, he had left and said he was going to go the bathroom but really went to get high with some of his friends he had met up with. He insisted on driving my car home and totaled it. When the police came, he pointed to me that I was the one driving. Best worst date ever.” – Heidi Grey

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