Category Archives: School News

From Broadway to Rockwell: Meet Mr. Dave Walker

by Sandro Gvaramia

A good teacher puts their heart into teaching, by doing so, the students feel their passion and hard work. When a teacher works hard for the students, students will put in their effort as well.

Dave Walker, a drama teacher at Rockwell, exemplifies these qualities of a great teacher. He has been involved in acting for 25 years. He has toured with Broadway many times, and has an immense experience in and knowledge of acting. He recently got married, settled in Utah and is currently starring as Joseph Pulitzer in a production of Newsies at the Hale Center Theater in Orem.

“I wanted to teach at Rockwell because I love seeing young students’ devotion and passion for acting at a young age,” Walker said. “This made me want to share what I have gained from all of my experiences as an actor.”

He has enjoyed teaching students at Rockwell and believes that every one of them has a bright future in acting. Student actors at Rockwell really are great at what they do, but some students who have talent for acting are either shy or afraid to take a step for many reasons.

“There are a lot of students in drama and all of them outside of acting are different at what they do in their spare time,” Walker said. “Some love music and some play sports, but that does not hold them back from doing what they are passionate about.”

Students love Walker and say that he has an ability to spark a passion for acting in them.

“Dave is one of the most splendid human beings I have ever met,” said Rockwell senior Jake Meese. “He’s blunt, he’s understanding, genuine, and kind. I have learned so much from him. I will be forever changed by my interactions with him.”

Walker has worked with many respected actors and producers. He has played dozens of roles and has come to teach at Rockwell to give young student actors his insight. He encourages all students who are interested in acting to pursue it as early as possible.

“If you ever thought about wanting to be a part of the drama program, you are always welcome and encouraged to do so,” Walker said. “There is no time like the present.”

A Look into the Life of a Foreign Exchange Student

By Sandro Gvaramia

Studying a year abroad is both an amazing and a challenging experience. You get to meet people, make friends, and get a second family (if you’re lucky enough) outside of your home country.

Imagine leaving your normal life behind – your family and everyone and everything you’re used to ever since you were a baby – and starting a new life without people you have been with all your life. Although it might seem really hard at first, it actually gets easier as you start to adjust and open up. Plus, it helps when you’re aware that this is just for a year or so.

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Rockwell’s foreign exchange students pose for a photo. Credit: Ashlee Milton

There are many ways to spend an academic year abroad. You can pay for it on your own or you can win a scholarship which completely pays for the year abroad. Either way, you become an exchange student, but if you’re not mentally and psychologically prepared for it then you should maybe give it a second thought. There are cases when exchange students cannot finish what they started for many reasons, but usually it’s because of being homesick.

“I miss my family, but my boyfriend and friends help keep my mind off of it.” says Rockwell senior, Sarah Olsen, from Denmark.

Speaking of homesickness, I think this is the hardest part. Now you will not be homesick the day you arrive in a foreign country because you are all excited, but after several weeks or maybe months you’ll start to feel homesick, and not just about your family, but about everything and the way things used to be. This is totally normal, and there are countless ways to cope with it.

Another thing that may come as an obstacle is the foreign language. For some students it can be really difficult, especially since knowing just your native language can make it hard enough not to say anything about speaking the second language fluently. Nobody expects of you to know the second language fluently, so there’s nothing to worry about. You might just need a basic knowledge of ways to interact with people that do not speak your first language. If you are really determined to have a successful exchange year, you can always find a way to master the language.

Besides being homesick, a cultural shock can be really hard to bear especially if you have not been fully prepared for what’s to come.

For exchange students that spend their years in the United States it can be a lot easier because every foreign exchange student goes through trainings where students are informed about what living in the United States is like. The people who inform you this stuff are Americans, so students are getting first-hand information about what their exchange experience will be like.

Regardless of preparation, there are still students who have a really hard time adjusting, which is totally normal. It can be stressful feeling constantly culture-shocked, but this is where the host family can be of help.

Host families are a huge part of an exchange year. If you win a scholarship, you are funded by the US Government, and then wait to be notified about your host family. No exchange student gets to choose which state they will be placed in or which family they’ll be living with.

“My host family is great at taking me places.” says Reia Martaba, a Rockwell junior from Japan.

Some exchange students get really lucky with their host family. They form strong relationships with their host family as they become like second families outside of their home country who they really bond with.

I have learned a lot in my experience as an exchange student from the country Georgia. I think the biggest thing I have learned so far is how to be more of an adult and become more independent. Each exchange student will get something different out of their experience abroad – it all depends on the student and how they react to things that may happen during their year. Experiences will vary with ups-and-downs, but it all comes down to how the student is willing to shape their exchange year based on their involvement, their attitude, and their relationship with their host family.

Premy Tangpong, a junior from Thailand says, “I think joining the sports team and school in general is one of the highlights of my exchange year.”

RCHS Breaks Ground for Track Friday

by Marshal Magazine Staff

Students, staff, faculty, and community members gathered outside Friday afternoon to celebrate the groundbreaking of Rockwell’s latest addition – a brand new track.

“It’s cool that we’re getting a track,” said Rockwell junior Aimree Swift. “It was neat to be a part of this. Good job, Rockwell.”

The Rockwell track team has been holding track & field practices in the back parking lot since its opening in 2008.

“Having a track at Rockwell is really exciting,” said Rockwell sophomore and track team member Diana Figueroa. “Not only is it going to help our running improve, but it will make it so we don’t have to fight the buses and cars about who gets the parking lot after school.”

Today’s groundbreaking began with a few words from Principal Darren Beck and RCHS board member Tiffany Southern. Athletic Director RaNell Goldthorpe then took her seat in the tractor to dig the first hole, followed by board member Tiffany Southern. Track team members, teachers, staff, seniors, and administrators then took turns completing a celebratory shoveling while posing for a photo.

“It was exciting to witness an expansion of Rockwell,” said Rockwell teacher Jake Hampton. “I think the track will be a great addition to the school, and it’s an honor to see it happen from the beginning.”

The track is set to begin construction soon and will be ready to use beginning with the 2019-2020 school year.

See the gallery below for photos of the event, courtesy Diana Figueroa. 

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Celebrate World Down Syndrome Day with Crazy Socks

by Chae Ewell

57465075592__4538064A-1197-4508-AFBA-854C50ECD312Each year, March 21st marks World Down Syndrome Day. Down Syndrome is a chromosomal disorder that occurs when there’s an error in the process of cell division, resulting in an extra chromosome. The most common form of Down Syndrome is trisomy 21, a third 21st chromosome. This is why we celebrate on March 21st (3/21).

“My sister has trisomy 21,” said Rockwell freshman Doug Ewell. “I think it’s really cool. She is one of the most optimistic and happy people I know.”

As the chromosomes look like socks, we invite you to wear crazy socks on World Down Syndrome Day, March 21. Wear mismatched, crazy colors, knee highs, tie dye, or crazy patterns of any kind. Doing so will help spread awareness and honor those who live with Down Syndrome every day.

(Image via TheStranger.com)

 

The Blue & Gold Unwind: Dealing with Bullying and Gossip

by Katie Hull

Image via whyy.org

The definition of bullying is to seek to harm, intimidate, or coerce someone. Even though Rockwell is a smaller school bullying still happens here. I do believe it happens less than most schools because we all know each other more personally and the teachers know us. Gossip is a huge form of bullying. The problem is because we are such a small school, gossip spreads like wildfire. No one likes to be gossiped about so why does anyone feel the need to spread it about others? It doesn’t make sense.

The most important thing to know is that if somebody is spreading gossip about you, realize that they are trying to hurt you and remove them from your life. There is absolutely no excuse for gossip or bullying. It is harmful and hurtful to the person being gossiped about and the friendships that are involved. You need to know also that if they are spreading gossip about you, more likely than not, it is not personal. They are going to spread gossip about anyone and you happened to fall into the light this time. Don’t try to get back at them or get into a fight with them because in the long run it will not help or do anything positive for you or the other people involved. Just stay away from them. You do not need poisonous people in your life.

If you are the one gossiping or bullying others you need to take a long look at yourself and understand that it is not okay. You will get caught and you are hurting another human being. Nothing makes you better than other person. If you are doing this because your life is hard and want others to feel like you, realize that you have no idea what this person you are hurting is dealing with at home or when you aren’t around. It is also against the law to bully, cyber-bully, haze someone or be part of retaliation bullying. It is against the law for teachers to not report it to administration and for administration to not involve parents. If you endanger or purposefully distress another student or school employee, it is bullying and against the law. Bullying is wrong.

If you are getting bullied, harassed, or feel threatened you need to report it to a teacher or guardian immediately. It is not okay that this is happening to you and you need to realize what it is; it’s bullying.

The Blue & Gold Unwind: Dealing with Stress and Anxiety

by Katie Hull

Everybody deals with stress. I do too. I have an incredibly stressful life that sometimes overwhelm me. I have a job, go to school, deal with the stresses of having a social life and extra-curricular activities. It is normal to be stressed, it is okay to be stressed. It is okay to have a screaming all day breakdown. Don’t stay there. There are ways where you can find help; you can find outlets for this stress and you can find people who will help you and listen to you.

I had a lot of responses from my “How do you deal with stress and anxiety?” poll on Instagram this week. Thank you to all of those that did. One of the main responses I got was journaling and writing. Many people said that they feel better after they write down all of the stress they are feeling and why they think they feel this way. Another person said something similar, they make to do list so whatever they are stressed about they can figure out how to handle it one at a time. A few responses said that they cry or hold it all inside. Crying is a perfectly healthy way to let out your emotions and I fully support you. Holding it all inside is not a healthy way to deal with stress. I understand that you don’t want to hurt anyone but the people who love you the most will want to help you get through these things. You need to let it out.

Music. Music is a great way to block out the world and other people for a little while. It can also help some people to accomplish their work faster and better. Find a playlist that helps you release all these built-up emotions.

Another way is set aside some time for yourself. Spend at least ten minutes every day doing something you love. Reading, playing video games, singing, watching a movie, or talking with your friends, do something that makes you happy. Basically try to spend time doing something that gets you away from all of these stressful situations. The end of the term is almost over and fourth term can be a fresh start. You can do it. Summer is gonna be here before you know it.

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