School News

Humans of Rockwell: David Salinas

“I’m David Salinas. I grew up in Orem, Utah. My whole life has been based around soccer. I now play for the Westlake soccer team. I also run track, so basically my life has been built around sports. I’ve learned a lot from this – not only more about the sports I play, but more about myself too. My coach always tells me to push yourself and when you feel like giving up is when you push yourself even harder. I use that as a metaphor for my life when challenges arise it gets me through them.

I’m really grateful to be able to play the sports I love and have a passion for and I hope to be able to play those sports for a long time.” – David Salinas, Junior

You paint your own road

by Keegan Beck

There is a large handful of metaphors used when it comes to graduation, but I want to paint you a picture of one seldom overused.

Picture this: you are sitting in a car, you look in front of you, and you see an open road. Now, picture again, a road that is filled with cars, stopping, going, and stopping again. This is a situation many of us face every day, and that is a metaphor for our every day lives.

With graduation just hours away, the graduating class of 2017 has a lot to think about and a lot to enjoy. This day has been waiting for these seniors. But these seniors have not stopped plugging along to reach their final destination in this chapter of their lives – high school graduation. They will anxiously walk across the stage and receive that diploma. But that is not the end. It is just the beginning. What road will these graduates take?


“Your future is really up to you. You paint your own road.”


Be sure to join the Rockwell class of 2017 graduates at the Show Barn at Thanksgiving Point on May 25, 2017. The ceremony will start at 6:00 pm.

Student Submission: How to Commit Suicide

This post isn’t what it sounds like. Please read and spread the word.


There comes a time in your life when all you want is to find a way out. You become desperate, but that doesn’t matter. Nothing else matters in the whole world except finding a way out of all the pain around you. You start to think “what’s the point of being here when everything is a disaster?”. This article is going to teach you how to commit suicide.

1.) Come to your breaking point. We all have that one point that we just crumble and can’t take anything anymore. Everything around us has just turned for the absolute worst so what’s the point of staying? It is the first step in deciding to commit suicide and the turning point in your life.

2.) Find what you are going to commit suicide with. There are many things that you can use to kill yourself with. It’s choosing the object or specific way that’s the difficult part. Almost everything is toxic or painful to humans.

3.) Throw whatever you chose away because you are better than that. Suicide isn’t the best option because there are so many people that love you. You are such an amazing person and I need you, I love you. You are so much more than the words and names that they call you.

4.) Find an alternative. There are different alternatives such as writing, drawing, talking to people, kill other people (video games), non stressful video games, or even finding an activity to do with your spare time. There are so many other better things that you can do than to commit suicide.

So to wrap this up these are the four easy simple steps to commit suicide. First step is to come to your breaking point. Second step is to find what you are going to commit suicide with. Third throw whatever you chose away because you are better than that. Our fourth and final step is to find an alternative. Suicide is not the answer.

 

A Night of Drama

by Dylan Beck

Rockwell Drama goes to their 2A state competition on April 20. They received a 3rd place in the One Act and the Overall Sweepstakes for Region on March 16th.

The coach of the drama team, Ms. Holt, tells her team to “tell the story” every practice. Holt has been the coach or the assistant every year Rockwell has been a school and has had a team. Many first place wins and medals from Shakespeare and/or Region & State are seen in the medals display closet.

There are 6 seniors on this year’s team of 30 who will be representing Rockwell at the state competition:

Alexis Jacquez
Sam Lofgren
Kade Santiago
Aimee Swift
Hollie Alder
Felicia Jacquez
Kylee Hancock
Victoria Wozab
Jordan Santiago
Amelia Tyler
Isaiah Anderson
Megan Nelson
Cassandra Nelson
Tessa Larsen
Melodie Anderson
Sam Morey
Brooklyn Allen
Tiny Madsen
Destiny Dipo
Brekyn Holland
Lynsie Gifford
Tai Chizmadia
Mackenzie O’Neill
Topanga Wozab
Ben Sherman
Sean Chizmadia
Dylan Beck
Marshall Sellers
Rhain Boulter
Alyssa Smith

Rockwell senior Lynsie Gifford has competed in Region/State for 4 years. Lynsie is one of the main women parts in the one act, and also does a monologue from “Neil Hilborn’s Future Tense.” She received enough superiors to go to state this year. Her favorite part about Region/State throughout her 4 years is growing close as a team.

“I love becoming friends with everyone on the team,” she said. “And the coaches are great.”

Hollie Alder, also a senior, has done Region/State for 3 years. Hollie is one of the main women parts in the one act and performed a scene with Felicia Jacquez from “Merry Wives of Windsor.” They also received enough superiors to go to state. She says the most memorable play she’s done in her 3 years was “Elephant’s Graveyard.”

“It was my first year doing Region and State and I will never forget it,” she said. “This year we are hoping to place high at state.”

Tonight is the drama night of Region/State, where the team will perform their pieces for students, families, and the community. Performances start at 6:00, so come and enjoy this year’s drama team before they head out to the state competition.

Prom: A Black Tie Event

by Baylee Percell

Prom 2017 is just around the corner!

Prom is going to be held on Saturday, April 15, at Garden Near The Green. This year’s theme is Black Tie (meaning a formal evening).

The majority of Rockwell students are beyond excited for the upcoming  prom

“I can’t believe it’s already Prom,” said Rockwell sophomore Malia Sellers. “I’m excited to see how the theme goes. It’s going to be a lot of fun!”

Students look forward to dates, but also look forward to spending time with their friends in an atmosphere other than the day-to-day school interactions.

“I’m excited to spend time with my friends,” said Rockwell junior Alexa Camargo.

Student government had a hard time picking the theme of prom this year; it was left up to 11th grade student government members to pick the perfect theme.

“We’ve been ordering decorations, backdrops, and swag for prom court,” said 11th grade Student Government Advisor, Mrs. Petersen. “There are also a few surprises for everyone attending.”

Student government put a lot of time and effort into this Prom. It’s bound to be a great time had by all. Between day dates, dinners, and the culminating event being the Prom itself, there will be something for everyone.

“A group of us are going to Boondocks and Cheesecake Factory for a day date,” said Rockwell sophomore Destiney Johnson. “It’s going to be a great time.”

Racism or the reverse?

by Baylee Percell

Reverse racism has become one of the most controversial topics in society today. While many say that reverse racism is “a thing,” others strongly oppose; I believe that many people fail to recognize it exists.

White people can be treated better than people with color – I completely agree and recognize that – but at the same time, black people can be treated better than white people. For example, the media holds certain advantages for black people such as the “Black Lives Matter” campaign, the “Miss Black America” program, ABC’s comedy show “Blackish” and the BET awards. If you replaced any of these with white people then society would be completely outraged. How does that sound like equality?

I also recognize the recent issue with cops discriminating against black people, such as the Michael Brown case. In this case, an 18 year old black man looking at a bright future got shot by Darren Wilson, a white police officer. But have you ever heard about Jermaine Saunders? He is a black cop who shot Daniel Kevin Harris, a 29 year old white man who was deaf and couldn’t speak. Chances are you never heard about the Daniel Kevin Harris case because there weren’t any riots, protests, or speeches just because it certainly doesn’t fit with the mainstream media message about white cops discriminating against black people. The media doesn’t like to show the discrimination against white people like they like to show it against black people.

“I think it’s true that some black people when meeting white people think they are racist,” said Lola Kliesch. “They feel as if the white race thinks they’re superior without even knowing us.”

Slavery officially ended on December 6, 1865, but discrimination continued until powerful figures like Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. took a stand. They weren’t trying to make black people anymore superior; they wanted equality.

Muslims aren’t always terrorists, black people aren’t always thugs and white people don’t always think that they’re better than anyone because of their skin color. I believe in equality. Or, more specifically, I believe that all races should be treated equal and no advantages should be given towards Black, White, Muslim, Indian, etc. We all have certain things in common: we all are human, we all feel, and we all want the best for ourselves. I’d hope we all want what’s best for everyone around us, no matter how they look.

Teacher Spotlight: Janel Jones

by Brooklynn Allen

jones_janelMs. Jones was born in Seattle, WA in 1988. Jones attended Hazen High School in Renton, Washington and later attended UVU.

“My entire high school experience was a nonstop series of misfortunes and humiliations,” said Jones.

Ms. Jones enjoyed participating in music programs in high school and loves being involved with the music program now as a teacher.
“In school I was in both band and choir,” she said. “Honestly, I loved getting acquainted with music I wouldn’t otherwise have come in contact with. Like no one is just listening to Latin liturgical music in their spare time (except me maybe), or Fijian folk songs, and so it’s a singular opportunity we have to actually connect with groups of people we wouldn’t know anything about. I struggled sometimes because I was a bossy teenager (ENFJ), but now I’m not bossy, I’m the boss!”

Jones became a teacher because, frankly, she couldn’t help it. She works in the music department here at Rockwell, where she teaches American Music Roots, choir, and band.

Ms. Jones has had quite a few highlights in teaching thus far, but she says the best is when the choir ends the songs on key every time. She also loved their performance of Lux Aeterna from the last music concert.


“I love the music program at Rockwell because I get to work with really cooperative people. It’s so easy to collaborate and plan with Ms. Larsen and Mr. Jewkes. Plus, all of the students I work with are really fun and interesting people that I love having near me.”

– Janel Jones


Ms. Jones enjoys raspberry mochas, visiting Uruguay, watching Muppet Christmas Carol, and reading Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier.

Jones’s role model is her dad.

“He is the smartest and best human being on this planet, and he spends his whole life trying to help people,” she said. “He taught me that there are plenty of things in this life that two intelligent people can disagree about.”