Category Archives: Feature

‘This American Life’: Q&A with Rockwell’s Exchange Students

by Kaya Garza

Many of us have been personally touched by exchange students as we’ve learned so much about their cultures, way of life, and languages. When they come to Rockwell, they bring little pieces of their country with them and we are lucky enough to have them share that with us as they see our country through foreign lenses.

Marshal Magazine sat down with some of these foreign exchange students to find out more about where they came from and their time in America.

Fabio Malta, Brazil

IMG_2902Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The prices.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The parties.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: New family and friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Americans are less friendly than Brazilians.

Q: Do you like America?
A: For sure.

Jeff Yuan, China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The way of government and school.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The food.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: School.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

Jun, South Korea

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The food.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The driving/drivers.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Food

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: I miss my friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: School is very different.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes.

Hanter, China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The culture and the respect.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: Education

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Making good friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Church. It is a big part of everything.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

Chrystee , China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: America has a different culture, and the houses are very different.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The people are really helpful and nice.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: School.

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A:The weather.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes.

Sofie Larsen, Denmark

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: I love the outgoing people, and I love that everyone speaks English. I love this language.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: I love the culture, the habits, family, food, and drinking. I can drink in Denmark.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Fast food places! Everywhere!

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Having to leave and say goodbye to good friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Nobody wears the same style, everybody wears Converse, and dinner is so early!

Q: Do you like America?
A: I love it. “Put, I’m loving it!“

Clemens Block, Germany

Screen Shot 2018-03-27 at 4.15.14 PMQ: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: I like it that sports are more of a focus in school. You have much more possibilities to practice and do your sport in a competitive way because the school is respecting your sport and is helping you do it by the different high school teams. You can also practice during school which I think is very cool.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: I like it that you have better possibilities to learn other languages.
Also, I like that you are not only learning the surface of a math topic.

Q: What is your fave thing about the U.S.?
A: I like that you can get your driver‘s license at 16.

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: It’s a little bit the racism in some states, which I didn‘t really notice, but I am often hearing some bad news over it.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: The first thing was definitely the food, which caused some stomach problems. It’s not bad, and it’s better than our food, but our food is healthier. It was also a bit hard for me to understand American English because I was used to British English.

Q: Do you like America?
A: I would say I love America. It is the country of many possibilities. The people are very relaxed and also very nice to non-native speakers, which surprised me.

Aom, Thailand

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The people, they are so friendly and helpful!

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The food.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Kaya

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Americans are very sad some days and very happy the next.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Americans eat dinner together and do everything together!

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

May, Thailand

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: Sidewalks! They make things easier.

Screen Shot 2018-03-27 at 4.15.00 PMQ: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The culture and the importance of respect.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: The weather.

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Little children are crazy.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Water fountains. We don’t have those

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

Daniel, China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: It is much bigger.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: Everything is very convenient.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Basketball, friends

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

We’ve Got Spirit…How ‘Bout You?

by Sidney Bernabeu

Rockwell may be a small school but their school spirit makes the school seem a lot bigger.

Rockwell’s students are enthusiastic about cheering on their school. They cheer on their peers whenever the chance to arises. Students aren’t afraid to show some school pride; they cheer on the school’s teams as much as they can. Student government organizes activities and assemblies for students so they can show school spirit by getting involved and have some fun while doing it.

Rockwell encourages its students and community to get involved in service, each year the school does a “change wars” fundraiser to raise money to bring holiday cheer to Rockwell families. Rockwell’s students always come out to support their school it doesn’t matter when it is, students always come.

“I love Rockwell,” said senior Aubri Bailey. “I love how small it is. I love the teachers and I love how everyone knows each other. I also love playing volleyball and softball here. Honestly, I’m not ready to leave high school. High school is my safe place. I’m graduating, and I’m excited, but I’m scared at the same time.”

Rockwell students love to support the school at various events.

“I think Rockwell has a lot of school spirit. We come together at basketball games and make sure we support the teams. But I feel like we need to support the school as a whole – not just the athletic events. School spirit isn’t just about cheering on the athletic teams – it’s about cheering on the school.”

– Katherine Pinheiro, junior

Whether students have been here since 7th grade, or have transferred in mid-year, they love what they find here at Rockwell.

“I came from Orem High mid-year, and I love that the teachers are a lot more accessible here,” said junior Peyton McCann-Ashton. “Having moved in the middle of the term and being socially anxious, it is difficult for me to start a conversation to make friends, but here, I didn’t have to. Everyone is friendly and that makes it easier to talk and have fun with others.”

Sterling Parker: The Voice of Rockwell

by Alyssa Smith

Since the age of three, basketball has been of interest to Coach Parker.

IMG_4656 copy

“My mother enjoyed sports and bought me a little hoop that hung on the kitchen door,” he said. “I would put my underwear on backwards and shoot all day.”

Parker grew up on a mink ranch on Dimple Dell Road and had chores as early as five years old.

“My folks taught me how to work early in life,” he says. “I am still working and I am 70 years old.”

This work ethic has carried Parker through difficult times in his life.

 

Parker has been going to high school basketball games since he was a young boy, and sports have always been a big part of his life.

Parker currently enjoys coaching the Rockwell boys’ basketball team. He feels fortunate to know the players and their background stories.

“Teaching them to be successful in life is very important to me,” he said. “I try to help them see that failure is not an option.”

 

Parker has been teaching and coaching at Rockwell for 6 years. He started announcing games as the voice of Rockwell before he began coaching the sophomore boys team four years ago. He looks out for students and is a friend to all.

IMG_4807

“I want each student to know they are loved and that everyone has self worth,” he said. “We are all someone.”

Parker also enjoys having friendships with the staff and working with people he cares about.

“Working at Rockwell is an amazing experience,” Parker said. “I get the choice blessing of working with my daughter, Candice, every day.”

Rockwell faculty members appreciate Parker and his dedication to the students, the basketball team, and the school.

Teachers of Rockwell: Faculty Shares their Best and Worst Dates

by Kaylee Birnbaum | Dates can be super fun, but some can be a total waste of time; you never know quite what to expect. We interviewed teachers at Rockwell to hear about some of the best and worst dates they’ve ever had.

“I was casually dating this girl. I picked her up in my freshly painted VW Squareback on our way to Raging Waters. After about 15 minutes, she slipped off her sandals and put her foot right on my newly painted pinstripes. I asked her ‘Will you take your feet off my dash?’ She rolled her eyes and took her feet down. A few minutes later, she put them back up again and started wiggling her toes trying to prove a point. I pulled over my car and told her to get out. I had a great time at Raging Waters by myself, though.” – Andrew Young

“My first and only date was going to a drive in movie on a TWO seat red tractor. After that, I was the ‘nerd of the school.’ Everybody had trucks and cars and I had a tractor.” – Sterling Parker

“My best date was the first date I had with my wife. Part of it was at the beach near San Francisco. As we were walking in the ocean, the current got ahold of her and took her completely under. I reached down in the water, grabbed her shirt as hard as I could and lifted her out. So I saved her life on the first date making me look really good!” – Brian Hull

“One of my favorite dates was playing Finger Paint Pictionary! Painting Chuck Norris was a challenge, but he figured it out. I also went on a date from a dating app and we went out to eat. At one point he stopped in the middle of his sentence, paused and said ‘Sorry, I just got lost in your eyes.’” – SarahKay Larsen

“On the first date with my second fiancee, we ordered a pizza, headed up the canyon, roasted marshmallows, and just talked. Talked for HOURS. We got attacked by a wild raccoon (true story, he stole most of our candy), lit a page on fire from ‘Wreck This Journal,’ and kissed in the rain. It was simple and sweet.” – Marshall Madsen

“I went on a date in college to a concert. My date asked if I could drive and not thinking much of it I said yes. Once we got to the concert, I realized that he had only bought his ticket and I had to buy my own. During the show, he had left and said he was going to go the bathroom but really went to get high with some of his friends he had met up with. He insisted on driving my car home and totaled it. When the police came, he pointed to me that I was the one driving. Best worst date ever.” – Heidi Grey

Movie Review: Star Wars – The Last Jedi

By Keegan Beck

During winter break the entertaining saga returned to the theaters. On December 15, 2017, Star Wars: The Last Jedi made its debut around the country. The saga continues with the First Order reigns having decimated the peaceful Republic. Supreme Leader General Snoke now deploys his legions to seize military control of the galaxy. The only ones that are standing up against the rising tyranny, First Order is General Leia Organa’s band of resistance fighters. The resistances have hope that Jedi Luke Skywalker will return and restore a spark of hope to the fight.

The heroine, Rey, discovers herself and finds out that she is way more than some person from the desert planet Jakku. While trying to convince Skywalker to come help the resistance fight the first order, Skywalker is uncertain about Rey’s powers.

“The rebellion is reborn today. The war is just the beginning. And I will not be the Last Jedi.” – Luke Skywalker

The Last Jedi was a very interesting and filled with action and adventure. With Disney buying the rights to Star Wars, I thought I was going in to see a Disney made film but instead it was action-packed and an incredible story. The director, Rian Johnson, and the producer, J.J Abrams, put together a great film and understood the meaning behind being a Jedi. There were a lot fans that were really happy about the film and had those “called it” moments, but I really enjoyed the film. They gave more information about different characters in this film, and it kept me very focused and interested the whole time.

I would recommend this movie to everyone far far away from different planets and galaxies to go see Star Wars: The Last Jedi in theaters. And may the force be with all of you.

Teachers of Rockwell: Jacob Hampton

by Kaylee Birnbaum | Marshal Magazine |

Jacob Hampton is a new teacher at Rockwell this year. He teaches English 11 and Intro to Film. Students have gotten to know and love the way he contributes to our school.

“I love when my students and I can joke together,” Hampton said. “Telling people what to do all day is taxing, so it’s nice when we can all forget about that dynamic for a minute and just laugh together.”

Hampton attended UVU, got a black belt in karate when he was 12, and secretly wishes he had mind reading powers. He has a passion for film and has written for UVU’s newspaper, worked as a film critic for a website called Rogue Auteurs, and even had his own band in high school called Juice Box. They won Orem High School’s Battle of the Bands in 2011 and continued to advance to the state level of competition. Music and movies have always been a big part of Hampton’s life.

Becoming a teacher is something in which Hampton finds great fulfillment.

“I wanted to become a teacher because I love being able to share things I’m passionate about with others in ways that help them learn,” Hampton said.

Hampton works hard in what he does and always has the students’ interests in mind. Helping students is what he loves to do.

To those wanting to become a teacher, Hampton says to have a thick skin.

“Don’t worry,” Hampton said. “Not all the kids who act like they hate you actually do.”

Rockwell is glad to have Hampton as a member of the team.

Teachers of Rockwell: Stephanie Christensen

Rockwell Charter High School’s very own special education teacher, Stephanie Christensen, has made a huge impact on the special needs program.

She works very hard in what she does to accommodate all of her students and their individual needs.

“Challenges do arise, just as they would with regular education students,” Christensen said.

Special Education teaching is something she has always been interested in.

“My brother is special needs, and because of that I knew that I wanted to become a teacher,” Christensen said. “Special needs children and adults are often misunderstood.”

Christensen says that since becoming a teacher, she has learned a lot.

“I have lots of compassion for people who struggle and the desire to help them.”

Rockwell is lucky to have a teacher like Christensen.

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