10 Albums to Add to Your Summer Playlist

by Kaya Garza

Are_You_Experienced_-_US_cover-edit10. “Are You Experienced” by The Jimi Hendrix Experience – Not only is Hendrix the greatest guitarist of all time, he’s a phenomenal lyricist and performer. My grandma explained to me the day she got the record back in 1967.

“I was with my girlfriends, and back then Rock N’ Roll wasn’t very accepted by our parents, so we went behind their backs and bought the LP record anyways,” she said. “We played that every day in the summer.“

FMacRumours9.”Rumours“ by Fleetwood Mac – “My go-to summer album is Rumours by Fleetwood Mac,” said Rockwell senior Alexa Camargo. “I really like that album because every single song on it really speaks. I kind of get a light, airy vibe from it, but the songs are also about deeper things. I don’t know, it just feels like a good summer album to me. Also, Stevie is a goddess.”

bruce-springsteen-born-in-the-usa-expanded-edition-2-cd-2c5d8. “Born in the USA” by Bruce Springsteen – I, myself, am not the most patriotic, but when Born In The U.S.A. comes on, I can’t help but want to throw some tea in a harbor and light up a bunch of red, white and blue fireworks. They call Springsteen ”The Boss” for good reason.

7. “40 oz. to Freedom” by Sublime – How could I not throw in a Sublime album? Sublime are the gods of summer laziness, and this album is the CD that’s in all of our dad’s old junk drawer. So if your plan is sleeping in everyday, having fun all night- this is perfect for you. Tell me, are you a badfish, too?

220px-Kendrick_Lamar_-_Damn6. “DAMN.” by Kendrick Lamar – Kendrick Lamar may very well be the voice of the era, delivering the cold truth with a punch. From the daring track “XXX” to “HUMBLE,” Kendrick never fails to speak to his listeners in a way no one else can. This country needs a bit of work- and Kendrick won’t shut up about it. And neither should you.

5. “Traveller” by Chris Stapleton – This was me and my mom’s favorite album last summer, perfect for trips to Moab or Lava Hot Springs. Stapleton isn’t like many other country artists, as he brings back the true spirit of the genre. Influenced by some of the greats like John Denver and Hank Williams, Stapleton writes his heart out and can speak to every American. Give it a try.

4. “Odyssey” by HOME – “This album is iconic in the synthwave genre,” said Rockwell sophomore Connor Mackintosh. “The main highlight of the album, Resonance, is a simple but great track that inspires a unique feeling of melancholic nostalgia. It’s best experienced with your close friends on a long, nighttime drive in the middle of the a3321951232_5summer.”

3. “Dazed and Confused” Soundtrack – If you haven’t seen the movie, I’d recommend watching it sometime this summer. It’s witty, exciting, and could make anyone want to go back to the 1970s. And it’s got Matthew McConaughey, so that’s a plus. But the best thing about this film is the soundtrack. Iconic songs like ”Low Rider“ and “School‘s Out“ make for an excellent Friday night, whatever your plans may be.

2. ”Exodus” by Bob Marley (and The Wailers) – I was named after a Bob Marley song so maybe that makes me a bit biased, but no one can argue that Bob Marley is a true icon and ambassador of peace for the entire world. Best for vacations- (specifically Jamaica), the pool, or on the weekends.

1. The Black Panther Album (Inspired By), Kendrick Lamar, SZA, The Weeknd, and more – 53285814Black Panther is the most iconic movie of the 21st century- I’m ready to fight anyone on this. Kendrick Lamar and SZA’s “All The Stars” is by far the best track- one to listen to at any point in the summer. Jam out to it with the sun roof open, at a party, barbecues, or just hanging out with friends. You can’t be disappointed.

‘This American Life’: Q&A with Rockwell’s Exchange Students

by Kaya Garza

Many of us have been personally touched by exchange students as we’ve learned so much about their cultures, way of life, and languages. When they come to Rockwell, they bring little pieces of their country with them and we are lucky enough to have them share that with us as they see our country through foreign lenses.

Marshal Magazine sat down with some of these foreign exchange students to find out more about where they came from and their time in America.

Fabio Malta, Brazil

IMG_2902Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The prices.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The parties.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: New family and friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Americans are less friendly than Brazilians.

Q: Do you like America?
A: For sure.

Jeff Yuan, China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The way of government and school.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The food.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: School.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

Jun, South Korea

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The food.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The driving/drivers.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Food

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: I miss my friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: School is very different.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes.

Hanter, China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The culture and the respect.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: Education

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Making good friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Church. It is a big part of everything.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

Chrystee , China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: America has a different culture, and the houses are very different.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The people are really helpful and nice.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: School.

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A:The weather.

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes.

Sofie Larsen, Denmark

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: I love the outgoing people, and I love that everyone speaks English. I love this language.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: I love the culture, the habits, family, food, and drinking. I can drink in Denmark.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Fast food places! Everywhere!

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Having to leave and say goodbye to good friends.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Nobody wears the same style, everybody wears Converse, and dinner is so early!

Q: Do you like America?
A: I love it. “Put, I’m loving it!“

Clemens Block, Germany

Screen Shot 2018-03-27 at 4.15.14 PMQ: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: I like it that sports are more of a focus in school. You have much more possibilities to practice and do your sport in a competitive way because the school is respecting your sport and is helping you do it by the different high school teams. You can also practice during school which I think is very cool.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: I like it that you have better possibilities to learn other languages.
Also, I like that you are not only learning the surface of a math topic.

Q: What is your fave thing about the U.S.?
A: I like that you can get your driver‘s license at 16.

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: It’s a little bit the racism in some states, which I didn‘t really notice, but I am often hearing some bad news over it.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: The first thing was definitely the food, which caused some stomach problems. It’s not bad, and it’s better than our food, but our food is healthier. It was also a bit hard for me to understand American English because I was used to British English.

Q: Do you like America?
A: I would say I love America. It is the country of many possibilities. The people are very relaxed and also very nice to non-native speakers, which surprised me.

Aom, Thailand

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: The people, they are so friendly and helpful!

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The food.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Kaya

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Americans are very sad some days and very happy the next.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Americans eat dinner together and do everything together!

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

May, Thailand

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: Sidewalks! They make things easier.

Screen Shot 2018-03-27 at 4.15.00 PMQ: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: The culture and the importance of respect.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: The weather.

Q: What is your least favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Little children are crazy.

Q: What were some culture shocks when first coming to America?
A: Water fountains. We don’t have those

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

Daniel, China

Q: What do you like more about the U.S. than your home country?
A: It is much bigger.

Q: What do you like more about your home country than the U.S.?
A: Everything is very convenient.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the U.S.?
A: Basketball, friends

Q: Do you like America?
A: Yes!

We’ve Got Spirit…How ‘Bout You?

by Sidney Bernabeu

Rockwell may be a small school but their school spirit makes the school seem a lot bigger.

Rockwell’s students are enthusiastic about cheering on their school. They cheer on their peers whenever the chance to arises. Students aren’t afraid to show some school pride; they cheer on the school’s teams as much as they can. Student government organizes activities and assemblies for students so they can show school spirit by getting involved and have some fun while doing it.

Rockwell encourages its students and community to get involved in service, each year the school does a “change wars” fundraiser to raise money to bring holiday cheer to Rockwell families. Rockwell’s students always come out to support their school it doesn’t matter when it is, students always come.

“I love Rockwell,” said senior Aubri Bailey. “I love how small it is. I love the teachers and I love how everyone knows each other. I also love playing volleyball and softball here. Honestly, I’m not ready to leave high school. High school is my safe place. I’m graduating, and I’m excited, but I’m scared at the same time.”

Rockwell students love to support the school at various events.

“I think Rockwell has a lot of school spirit. We come together at basketball games and make sure we support the teams. But I feel like we need to support the school as a whole – not just the athletic events. School spirit isn’t just about cheering on the athletic teams – it’s about cheering on the school.”

– Katherine Pinheiro, junior

Whether students have been here since 7th grade, or have transferred in mid-year, they love what they find here at Rockwell.

“I came from Orem High mid-year, and I love that the teachers are a lot more accessible here,” said junior Peyton McCann-Ashton. “Having moved in the middle of the term and being socially anxious, it is difficult for me to start a conversation to make friends, but here, I didn’t have to. Everyone is friendly and that makes it easier to talk and have fun with others.”

Sterling Parker: The Voice of Rockwell

by Alyssa Smith

Since the age of three, basketball has been of interest to Coach Parker.

IMG_4656 copy

“My mother enjoyed sports and bought me a little hoop that hung on the kitchen door,” he said. “I would put my underwear on backwards and shoot all day.”

Parker grew up on a mink ranch on Dimple Dell Road and had chores as early as five years old.

“My folks taught me how to work early in life,” he says. “I am still working and I am 70 years old.”

This work ethic has carried Parker through difficult times in his life.

 

Parker has been going to high school basketball games since he was a young boy, and sports have always been a big part of his life.

Parker currently enjoys coaching the Rockwell boys’ basketball team. He feels fortunate to know the players and their background stories.

“Teaching them to be successful in life is very important to me,” he said. “I try to help them see that failure is not an option.”

 

Parker has been teaching and coaching at Rockwell for 6 years. He started announcing games as the voice of Rockwell before he began coaching the sophomore boys team four years ago. He looks out for students and is a friend to all.

IMG_4807

“I want each student to know they are loved and that everyone has self worth,” he said. “We are all someone.”

Parker also enjoys having friendships with the staff and working with people he cares about.

“Working at Rockwell is an amazing experience,” Parker said. “I get the choice blessing of working with my daughter, Candice, every day.”

Rockwell faculty members appreciate Parker and his dedication to the students, the basketball team, and the school.

Muscular Intensity meets Exhilaration in Marvel’s The Black Panther

by Alyssa Smith

The Black Panther was released to theaters on February 16. It was a thrilling new Marvel movie that has been the only movie since Avatar to top the box office for five straight weeks in a row.

“It was such an amazing movie,” said Rockwell sophomore Felicia Jacquez. “Everyone should go see it.”

Critics enjoyed this movie and thought it was very well-done.

“Like Taika Waititi before him, Ryan Coogler gives the Marvel template a bold auteurist twist with an African extravaganza,” said critic Jimi Famurewa. “It packs a muscular intensity and challenges as much as it exhilarates.”

Although Rotten Tomatoes gives this film a high 97%, a few people disagree with the majority vote.

“The film spirals into a stodgy tale of internecine feuding, in which T’Challa is required to come to terms with the sins of past generations,” said Ed Power, a critic from the Irish Independent. “What he doesn’t get to do much of is jump around beating up bad guys. That’s a shame.”

Go see The Black Panther, now in theaters, and let Marshal Magazine know what you think of the film.

Opinion: Is Black History Month Racist?

by Kaya Garza

Ever since Black History Month became a thing, there were people who stood firmly against it. There were people who said, “Gee. Why don’t me and my white ancestors get a history month? Don’t you think that’s a bit racist?”

Well, let me explain it to you.

Let’s start from the beginning. Black History Month began as “Negro History Week,” created by Dr. Carter G. Woodson. His intentions were very clear- he wanted to create such a time where the successes and triumphs of African-Americans were no longer overlooked and disregarded, and to cultivate an environment of learning, respect, and understanding. This eventually turned into “Black History Month,” which was celebrated in certain colleges and communities, and finally became recognized by President Gerald Ford in 1976.

Now, like we have seen, people were indifferent to the notion of a month dedicated to people who aren’t white, because this “separates black people from being Americans.”

Now, claiming they aren’t Americans is clearly atrocious, but honoring them, their history and cultures which we spent so long trying to erase, is NOT an act of separation and division, it is an act of respect and reparation.

When the majority of our elementary history was dedicated to certain “heroes” of the Civil War like Robert E. Lee, to our Founding Fathers, to our long line of clearly white presidents, to our colonial roots, the books have simply overlooked African-American achievement- and one month, trust me, couldn’t even cover a quarter. To honor such achievements of these true heroes and innovators of our country’s history is vital, and an absolute obligation.

Claiming that we should simply be blind to color and race is a sick attempt at burying the issues in the ground and pretending they don’t exist. Ignoring beautiful cultures and ways of life is not only ridiculous, but careless.

It is incorrect to suggest that a month dedicated to black people is an act of racism against white people who feel that their history is being erased in the process. This is a country built upon white supremacy; the “heroes” of our past are drenched in blood. This is a country where slavery has continually progressed- from chains, to segregation, to stereotypes- and everything in between. The endless media that pertains to ideas that every young black boy wants to be a basketball player and that every young black girl is loud and sassy, and that the “hood” and gangs are the closest thing to success black people will get is all that’s been fed into our brains. Black people are not drug dealers, gang members, and so on – they are doctors, soldiers, scientists, authors, and the like.

They have been too long overlooked. Asking for appreciation for 28 days out of the year is not racist, it is equalizing.

Athletes of Rockwell: Senior Night

by Alyssa Smith

The girls basketball team celebrated the seniors last week as they played APA Draper at home.

“Seniors: this is your last home game,” said Coach Troy Gifford. “So play your hearts out.”

This year’s team consisted of four seniors – Destiny Dipo, Megan Nelson, Kylee Berry, and Livia Chatwin – and two foreign exchange students – Sofie Larsen and Aom Kayhasai. Some of them have decided to take up basketball this year and have learned a lot in the process. Destiny Dipo has been playing high school basketball at Rockwell since 9th grade.

“Obviously the team changes every year,” Dipo said. “We just keep getting better and better.”

The team will miss having these seniors and exchange students next year.

“I wish I could come back and play next year,” said Aom Kayhasai, an exchange student from Thailand. “I love these girls so much.”

The girls on both JV and Varsity put everything into that game and came out with a win. The varsity score was 48-30.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

« Older Entries